Deputy killed, six wounded in Colorado shooting

Deputy killed, six wounded in Colorado shootingA sheriff's deputy was killed and six others, including four deputies, were wounded Sunday in what police called a "disturbance" in a residential suburb near Denver, Colorado. The lone suspect was killed at the end of a two-hour standoff at an apartment complex in Highlands Ranch, 12 miles (20 kilometers) south of Denver, Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock told reporters in a televised briefing. "They all went down almost within seconds of each other," Spurlock told reporters.


Deputy killed, six wounded in Colorado shooting

Deputy killed, six wounded in Colorado shootingA sheriff's deputy was killed and six others, including four deputies, were wounded Sunday in what police called a "disturbance" in a residential suburb near Denver, Colorado. The lone suspect was killed at the end of a two-hour standoff at an apartment complex in Highlands Ranch, 12 miles (20 kilometers) south of Denver, Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock told reporters in a televised briefing. "They all went down almost within seconds of each other," Spurlock told reporters.


Nuclear war with North Korea is closer than ever, says former US military chief

Nuclear war with North Korea is closer than ever, says former US military chiefThe United States is closer than ever before to war with North Korea, according to Mike Mullen, a retired admiral who served as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President Barack Obama. In an interview broadcast by ABC’s This Week programme he said he did not see any diplomatic resolution to the stand-off with Pyongyang as it goes about developing its nuclear missile capability and Donald Trump’s continues with his provocative rhetoric. “We're actually closer, in my view, to a nuclear war with North Korea and in that region than we have ever been,” he said on Sunday. “I don't see the opportunities to solve this diplomatically at this particular point.” Mr Trump has threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea if the US was forced to defend itself and repeatedly warned that all options are open to him. Meanwhile, South Korean authorities revealed they had seized a Panama-flagged vessel suspected of delivering oil products to North Korea in violation of international sanctions. Former Joint Chiefs chair Adm. Mike Mullen to @MarthaRaddatz: "We're actually closer, in my view, to a nuclear war with North Korea and in that region than we've ever been." https://t.co/aCXTlIgyPppic.twitter.com/fPAEQWFMYk— This Week (@ThisWeekABC) December 31, 2017 The seizure was the second to be announced by South Korea within a few days, as the United Nations steps up efforts to squeeze essential oil supplies to the reclusive North following its nuclear or ballistic missile tests. Mr Mullen, who also headed the Joint Chiefs under President George W Bush, said the crisis on the Korean peninsula was an example of the “dangerous climate” created by a president intent on upending Washington’s traditional approach to foreign policy. "I'm just more inclined to see over time that the rhetoric seems to be where the President is," he said. However, he added that for now the likes of James Mattis, defence secretary, John Kelly, White House chief of staff, HR McMaster, national security adviser, had managed to rein in the president.


Nuclear war with North Korea is closer than ever, says former US military chief

Nuclear war with North Korea is closer than ever, says former US military chiefThe United States is closer than ever before to war with North Korea, according to Mike Mullen, a retired admiral who served as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President Barack Obama. In an interview broadcast by ABC’s This Week programme he said he did not see any diplomatic resolution to the stand-off with Pyongyang as it goes about developing its nuclear missile capability and Donald Trump’s continues with his provocative rhetoric. “We're actually closer, in my view, to a nuclear war with North Korea and in that region than we have ever been,” he said on Sunday. “I don't see the opportunities to solve this diplomatically at this particular point.” Mr Trump has threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea if the US was forced to defend itself and repeatedly warned that all options are open to him. Meanwhile, South Korean authorities revealed they had seized a Panama-flagged vessel suspected of delivering oil products to North Korea in violation of international sanctions. Former Joint Chiefs chair Adm. Mike Mullen to @MarthaRaddatz: "We're actually closer, in my view, to a nuclear war with North Korea and in that region than we've ever been." https://t.co/aCXTlIgyPppic.twitter.com/fPAEQWFMYk— This Week (@ThisWeekABC) December 31, 2017 The seizure was the second to be announced by South Korea within a few days, as the United Nations steps up efforts to squeeze essential oil supplies to the reclusive North following its nuclear or ballistic missile tests. Mr Mullen, who also headed the Joint Chiefs under President George W Bush, said the crisis on the Korean peninsula was an example of the “dangerous climate” created by a president intent on upending Washington’s traditional approach to foreign policy. "I'm just more inclined to see over time that the rhetoric seems to be where the President is," he said. However, he added that for now the likes of James Mattis, defence secretary, John Kelly, White House chief of staff, HR McMaster, national security adviser, had managed to rein in the president.


Chief justice orders review of sexual harassment standards in U.S. judiciary

Chief justice orders review of sexual harassment standards in U.S. judiciaryU.S. Chief Justice John Roberts said on Sunday he would launch a review in 2018 of how the federal judiciary handles sexual harassment, following the recent resignation of a U.S. appeals court judge amid allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct and comments. In his annual year-end report on the federal judiciary, Roberts said the judicial branch of government was not immune to incidents of sexual harassment and addressing it would be a new challenge in the coming year. Allegations of systematic sexual harassment and assault that surfaced against movie producer Harvey Weinstein earlier this year galvanized women to speak out about instances of sexual harassment in the media, government and workplaces across the country.


Chief justice orders review of sexual harassment standards in U.S. judiciary

Chief justice orders review of sexual harassment standards in U.S. judiciaryU.S. Chief Justice John Roberts said on Sunday he would launch a review in 2018 of how the federal judiciary handles sexual harassment, following the recent resignation of a U.S. appeals court judge amid allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct and comments. In his annual year-end report on the federal judiciary, Roberts said the judicial branch of government was not immune to incidents of sexual harassment and addressing it would be a new challenge in the coming year. Allegations of systematic sexual harassment and assault that surfaced against movie producer Harvey Weinstein earlier this year galvanized women to speak out about instances of sexual harassment in the media, government and workplaces across the country.


Egyptian mummy can 'live forever' after development in scanning technique

Egyptian mummy can 'live forever' after development in scanning techniqueAn 3,000 year old Egyptian mummy can “live forever” after his name was discovered written on his sarcophagus, a curator has claimed. The desicated remains of the man formerly known as Irethoreru are held by Chiddington Castle, Kent, but his precise identity had always remained a mystery - until now. His name, which means “The eye of Horus is against them”, and is thought to date from between 664 BC and 30 AD, was discovered thanks to a scanning technique developed by British researchers from University College London and the University of Manchester along with collaborators in the United States. They were able to read hitherto invisible hieroglyphics painted on scraps of papyrus used to make the case for the mummified body by shining light of various frequencies onto them. The new technique was developed using fabricated scraps designed to mimic the ‘waste’ ancient materials, including ancient shopping lists and tax returns, which were recycled into sarcophagi. They were previously regarded as illegible, however, because the writing was obscured by the paste and plaster that holds the mummy together.  The mysterious mummy of Chiddingstone castle Credit: BBC News Prof Adam Gibson of University College London, who led the project said: "Because the waste papyrus was used to make prestige objects, they have been preserved. "These masks constitute one of the best libraries we have of waste papyrus that would otherwise have been thrown away so it includes information about these individual people about their everyday lives" Irethoreru’s name was discovered on a footplate of his coffin. Until now, researchers would have had to destroy the sarcophagus in order to read it. Castle curator Maria Esain said: "There is a saying from Ancient Egyptian times - "To speak a man’s name is to restore him to eternal life." Therefore, if we were able to determine the name written in hieroglyphs on the ‘foot’ of the coffin then we would be enabling that person to live forever.”