Bitcoin, other cryptocurrencies tumble on government crackdown worries

Bitcoin, other cryptocurrencies tumble on government crackdown worriesLONDON/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Bitcoin slid as much as 18 percent on Tuesday to a four-week low, as worries about a regulatory crackdown on the market spread after reports suggested it was still possible that South Korea could ban trading in cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin's slide triggered a selloff across the broader cryptocurrency market, with biggest rival Ethereum down 23 percent on the day at one point, according to trade website Coinmarketcap, and the next biggest, Ripple, plunging by as much as a third. Bitcoin traded as low as $11,191.59 on the Luxembourg-based Bitstamp exchange.


Kosovo Serb politician killed in drive-by shooting

Kosovo Serb politician killed in drive-by shootingProminent Kosovo Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic was shot dead in a brazen drive-by shooting on Tuesday that risked fanning ethnic tensions in the volatile region. The killers struck on the very day that Belgrade and Pristina resumed EU-moderated talks on normalising ties after a hiatus of more than a year. Both Serbian and Kosovo Albanian officials refrained from explicitly accusing each other of being behind the killing as the international community urged the two sides to remain calm.


Kosovo Serb leader shot dead in divided town of Mitrovica

Kosovo Serb leader shot dead in divided town of MitrovicaBy Fatos Bytyci and Ivana Sekularac PRISTINA/BELGRADE (Reuters) - Kosovo Serb leader Oliver Ivanovic, who was standing trial over the killings of ethnic Albanians during the 1998-99 war, was shot dead on Tuesday in what Serbia called an act of terrorism. The killing increased tension between Kosovo and Serbia, and a round of European Union-sponsored dialogue on a normalisation of relations that was due to take place in Brussels was suspended at the request of Belgrade. The European Union and United States called on both sides to remain calm and for Kosovo authorities to bring the killers to justice without delay.


Citigroup reports $18 billion loss on one-time tax items

Citigroup reports $18 billion loss on one-time tax itemsCitigroup Inc posted an $18-billion quarterly loss on Tuesday because of charges related to a new U.S. tax law, but its adjusted earnings beat Wall Street expectations and management signaled that the bank may soon lift financial performance targets. The law, signed by President Donald Trump last month, has made fourth-quarter earnings a messy ordeal for big banks. It forces them to take one-time hits on earnings held abroad and changes the treatment of deferred tax assets, both of which affect Citigroup in particular.


This Is the World's Fastest Plane (And Its Rotting in A Museum)

This Is the World's Fastest Plane (And Its Rotting in A Museum)The SR-71’s JP-7 fuel—which also had to be carried onboard specialized KC-135Q tankers to refuel the Blackbird—was designed to be a safe, high-flashpoint fuel that would not vaporize or blow up under extreme heat and pressure. Capable of cruising at speeds in excess of Mach 3.2, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird was the fastest air-breathing manned aircraft to ever to see operational service.


White House appears to confirm Donald Trump 's***hole countries' comments

White House appears to confirm Donald Trump 's***hole countries' commentsWhite House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders did not deny that Donald Trump had called Haiti and some African nations "s***hole countries" on Tuesday, saying the President himself had never denied using harsh language on immigration. "This is an important issue, he’s passionate about it, he’s not going to apologise for trying to fix our immigration system," she added.


Bannon before House Intelligence Committee over Trump-Russia links amid escalating war with President

Bannon before House Intelligence Committee over Trump-Russia links amid escalating war with PresidentSteve Bannon is in Washington DC to testify before members of Congress investigating alleged links between Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and the Kremlin. The House Intelligence Committee is grilling the former White House chief strategist behind closed doors on Tuesday following his spectacular fall from power, during which he accused the President’s son and others of “treasonous” behaviour for taking a meeting with Russians during the 2016 campaign. The testimony comes just one week after a very public excommunication from Mr Trump’s closest confidants following the publication of Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury.