Ben Carson: Martin Luther King’s Message Is ‘Urgently Needed to Heal the Divisions’ Now

Ben Carson praised Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy Friday at the White House, where a proclamation was  signed by President Donald Trump honoring the civil rights leader.

“I thank you for signing legislation to designate the birthplace, church, and tomb of Dr. Martin Luther King as a national historic park,” Carson said at the White House ceremony. “His monumental struggle for civil rights earned these places in his life, faith, and death, the same honor as Mount Vernon and that famous, humble log cabin in Illinois.”

Carson, now the secretary of Housing and Urban Development,  said King’s life and death impacted him as a young person.

“This April, we will observe the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination,” Carson said, adding:

I remember so vividly that day, as a high school student in Detroit. Far from silencing his dream, death wrought him immortal in the American heart. His message of equality, justice, and the common dignity of man resounds today, urgently needed to heal the divisions of our age.

The legacy of the civil rights leader should shape the character of society today, Carson said.

“Today we honor the legacy of the man who marched on Washington, for jobs and freedom, achieving both for millions of Americans of all races and backgrounds,” Carson said. “But his legacy also calls us to remember, where these ideas, equality, freedom liberty, get their power. Our good efforts alone are not enough to lend them meaning.”

Carson reinforced King’s stance of the importance of character for equality in humanity.

For what shall I be called equal to another man? It cannot be by wealth, for there will always be one richer than me, it cannot be by strength, for there will always be one stronger than me, it cannot be by success or happiness or beauty, or any other pieces of the human condition which are distributed through providence. So perhaps providence alone is the answer.

He quoted the Declaration of Independence to illustrate the importance of providence:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

 

The post Ben Carson: Martin Luther King’s Message Is ‘Urgently Needed to Heal the Divisions’ Now appeared first on The Daily Signal.

Martin Luther King Jr’s Niece: ‘My Uncle Would Have Been Very Pro-Life’

Martin Luther King Jr.’s niece says her uncle’s legacy as a civil rights leader has a strong impact on the pro-life movement today.

“As the niece of the Rev.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and I emphasize the Reverend because history has not always recorded his spiritual aspects…I have been mostly impacted by his messages of unity, of racial reconciliation, of course non-violence, and the strongest has always been and will always be for me the agape love message,” Alveda King told The Daily Signal in an interview Friday. “One of the things that we would say [is], ‘We must learn to live together as brothers,’ and I’ll add, as sisters, ‘or perish together as fools.’”

King, director of Civil Rights for the Unborn for Priests for Life,  said her uncle’s words show his commitment to respect for life.

“He said the negro cannot win if he is willing to sacrifice the futures of his children for immediate personal comfort and safety,” Alveda King said. “Abortion, of course, forces us to do exactly that.”

Alveda King, who formerly served in the Georgia State House of Representatives and was a college professor, said that she had two abortions herself.

“I actually had a miscarriage that was related to those abortions during my younger life, and so of course through the years I have become a born-again Christian, repented, and been healed and delivered, but I always think about those words from my uncle,” King said.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s wife, Coretta Scott King, received an award from Planned Parenthood in 1996 on behalf of her husband, but Alveda King says she knows her uncle would not have believed in the mission of Planned Parenthood:

His wife accepted that in his stead, because she was like me, she had accepted that agenda without understanding, I believe, but my uncle would have been very pro-life today.

The 31st annual March For Life in Washington, D.C., will be on Jan. 19, and Alveda King said her uncle’s crusade for civil rights applies to the pro-life movement today.

“I really believe that if my uncle were here today, he would encourage us to find solutions to the problems, even women’s problems and all problems without having to do violence to babies in the womb. I am just convinced that he would agree with that,” Alveda King said.

The post Martin Luther King Jr’s Niece: ‘My Uncle Would Have Been Very Pro-Life’ appeared first on The Daily Signal.

The Role Faith Must Play in America’s Future

Does faith matter anymore in America? Should it?

That probably depends on who you ask, but what is becoming increasingly evident is a growing hostility among some segments of society and culture.

Last month, much of our nation celebrated the birth of Christ—called Christmas, short for Christ’s Mass—yet, the idea of any public display for a clearly religious holiday is somehow considered insensitive, discriminating, or criminal.

One begins to wonder if even saying “God Bless you” after a sneeze might somehow generate formal complaints and a lawsuit to stop such egregious behavior. Sounds like nonsense doesn’t it?

Sadly, it’s not.

Religious expression in the marketplace of ideas is not an automatic religious endorsement by the government, though this remains a loud, but hollow cry among many who would deny those rights if given the power to do so.

When our nation was established, the idea of “self-government under God” was a prevailing theme. Today, it feels more like an increasingly intrusive government without God.

Teachers, football coaches, counselors, city and county officials, our men and women in uniform, chaplains, students, and even government officials, are being reprimanded for acknowledging God or Jesus Christ in almost any public forum.

Business owners—photographers, bakers, florists, and others—are being sued, some even closing their doors, for simply adhering to their values, beliefs, and their rights of conscience in an honorable fashion.

Millions of citizens are rising up to say “Enough” and declare that they still want to “keep faith in America.”

Millions of people in this country continue to pray and place a heartfelt trust in God. This simple act of humble faith has given America strength in wartime, dignity and compassion toward those less fortunate, and confidence in the face of unprecedented challenges.

For so many, faith matters, faith makes a difference, faith brings with it a renewed sense of hope for a better future. Thankfully, this certainty is finding its way back into the hearts, conversations, and actions of everyday Americans.

Throughout U.S. history, prayers of petition and thanksgiving have been lifted up by state and national leaders—to embrace our grief and sorrow, for our troops and first responders in harm’s way, in times of uncertainty and chaos, during global crises, for protection, provision, guidance, and the acknowledgement that in and of ourselves, we are wholly insufficient.

These cherished values are derived from principles deeply woven into the very fabric of our founding documents—the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights—and through the legacy and dedication of the men and women who helped build and shape this country.

The only way to preserve their sacrifice is to boldly move forward with courage and determination, and to walk out what we know to be true.

This legacy also speaks to why millions more have immigrated to our shores over the past three centuries and why countless others have risked everything to preserve our Judeo-Christian heritage.

Are these realities only because the United States is viewed as a “land of opportunity,” a global superpower, a place where dreams can come true? Or is it as the Pledge of Allegiance acknowledges, that we are “one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all?”

Americans have long viewed freedom as a core longing given by the Creator in His design of man and a primary reason that religious liberty was established as a leading principle in our nation’s founding.

The freedom to choose what and who you believe in, as well as matters of conscience, is among the most basic and fundamental rights afforded to every citizen. Faith and freedom may not have been born together, but their marriage built America, and divorcing the two would ultimately lead to its demise.

Unfortunately, the fabric of this wonderful tapestry is fraying, and in many places is now being torn apart. Religious leaders across America have been concerned about the moral and spiritual decline we are seeing in the country, including the lack of respect and civility that exists in our national discourse.

Polarized and entrenched positions, angry rhetoric, and other signs of acrimony reveal the growing loss of decency and tolerance on all sides. And yet, faith still matters. It still has a role to play in the days ahead. We must keep faith in America.

On Jan. 16, National Religious Freedom Day, thousands of people from all walks of life will join together in a powerful show of unity to raise their voices and launch the “Keep Faith in America” movement.

They will be joined by numerous federal and state legislators, governors, celebrities, and faith leaders who are uniting to help ensure that prayer, God, faith, and the Bible continue to represent an important guiding influence in America’s future—a movement dedicated to promoting freedom and civility, and to reduce the bitter animosity infecting nearly every part of our national psyche.

Things will kick off on the 16th at events across the United States and in 30 state capitols nationwide. Interested individuals can be part of the initial launch through a first-of-its-kind nationally broadcasted Facebook Live event that could potentially reach millions of people throughout the world.

In the following months, there will be a focus on other critically important segments of society, including churches and clergy members, colleges and universities, local governments, and school boards. Some of the most recognized and respected faith leaders in America are uniting to make a difference and reach into every sphere of influence in today’s culture.

Now, more than ever, there is a need to affirm that faith and trust in the Creator remain vital to our national wellbeing. He was understood as the God of the Bible, which was given to help guide our decision-making, our governance as a people, to protect religious liberty, and to live before others with humility and Christian love.

Believers should be leading the way when it comes to engaging society and culture with greater civility, focusing their efforts to reduce harmful divisions. Faith is the key in the days ahead, and it must move beyond a well-crafted sermon and become faith in action.

The Keep Faith in America movement is a renewal of hope. People can register to attend the Facebook Live Event on Jan. 16 by visiting either of the following links: Keep Faith in America Facebook or www.KeepFaithInAmerica.com.

The goal is to first stand together, then pray together, and finally, to move forward together.

Stand. Pray. Move. This is about a renewed hope, a strengthened resolve, a sharpened focus, a bold declaration, and an energized movement.

The post The Role Faith Must Play in America’s Future appeared first on The Daily Signal.

Here’s How Young Black Conservative Women Are Changing The Face Of The GOP

It’s pretty easy to name a couple of black women working in progressive circles and organizations, but it’s a lot harder to name the ones working within the conservative movement.

There’s a substantial national conversation about progressive black women like Tamika D. Mallory, an organizer of the Women’s March or Alicia Garza, a queer black woman who founded Black Lives Matter, who brought police brutality to the forefront of America or Tarana Burke who first created the #MeToo campaign that launched a conversation about the sexual harassment women face daily.

What’s less discussed are the young conservative, black women who are working every day to change and influence the Republican Party.

These women want to bring home a message of empowerment, not only to black women across the country, but also to the black community at large. Women such as Antonia Okafor, the founder of gun rights advocacy organization EmPOWERed, Ayshia Connors, a senior policy adviser to a Pennsylvania congressman and president of the Black Republican Congressional Staff Association, and Candace Owens, the director of Urban Engagement for Turning Point USA, all work tirelessly in advocating for their community and to make black conservative voices heard.

“Essentially, I believe in this day and age, for whatever reason, there is a largely ignored, growing group of voices which is essentially black conservatives. We’ve been largely dismissed and de-legitimized in the media as something that is not allowed to exist,” Owens, who labels herself an independent thinker, told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Owens is currently working on creating the first black leadership summit for Turning Point USA with the intent to bring young black conservatives from across the country to hear from other black leaders on how to become trailblazers and entrepreneurs within their community. Owens especially wants these young black conservatives to hear from fellow black leaders who don’t carry with them the same message the mainstream media does.

Okafor and Connors are also trying to make big strides within the conservative movement.

“I’m spreading the message of female empowerment through gun ownership, one that transcends all races,” Okafor said of her focus on her EmPOWERed college tour.

Connors, as the president of the Black Republican Congressional Staff Association, has not only doubled the number of members since she entered, but is also intent on using the organization to help young black Republicans and conservatives find jobs on Capitol Hill. Before joining as Pennsylvania GOP Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick’s senior policy adviser, Connors also worked with the Republican National Committee during the 2016 election.

Okafor is currently on her EmPOWERed tour, visiting college campuses to talk about female empowerment through gun ownership, a message not only for black women, but women of all races. Her tour includes stops at historically black colleges such as Howard University and Spelman College, where she hopes the face-to-face interaction with students will open their eyes.

“I think that what I hope to gain is that they see I am a person, a human being and I’m like them,” Okafor told TheDCNF. “I’m doing it because I want to empower the black community. I came out of being a closeted conservative and I’m vocal because when other people can see that there is someone else who looks like them and believes like them,unlike what society tells them to be like, it gives them courage.”

What many people don’t know is American history is a rich history with black women being unashamed of having conservative values.

There was Mildred Fay Jefferson, a pro-life activist, who was the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School, as well as Constance Berry Newman, a former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs under the former President George W. Bush’s administration. Also, Ida B. Wells, a founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, fought against the lynching of black people in America.

There’s still a lot more work that needs to be done, according to the women TheDCNF spoke to. They noted the GOP should work on messaging and how the party conveys their values to the black community should they wish to be successful with minorities in the future.

“A lot of the times when they have good ideas, they have trouble communicating them in a way that seems attainable,” Owens, also a vlogger, told TheDCNF, adding that the GOP should develop a sense of humor. “I think they just need a lot more personality.”

Connors also agreed that the Republican Party needs to work on messaging, but also how they explain those ideas to the black community. Most black Americans are naturally conservative and receptive to a message that centers around education leading to upward mobility. Criminal justice reform, often advocated by GOP Sens. Tim Scott of South Carolina and Rand Paul of Kentucky, also needs to pushed to the forefront, Connors said to TheDCNF.

Connors suggested making access for young people who want to serve on Capitol Hill, but may not have the resources to do so is crucial.

“You see a lot [of] people who aren’t able to come and intern on Capitol Hill because of financial hardship. Normally, it’s unpaid internships and a lot of people aren’t able to come and get that experience on Capitol Hill, which is why I don’t think you see a lot of minorities,” Connors told TheDCNF.

Okafor emphasized face-to-face interactions with people, saying the only way there can be a huge shift is if people talk one-on one. She pointed to Paul’s actions when he visited Howard University in 2015. Too often Republicans only enter the black community during an election cycle. Paul entered a black space and spoke to them about his conservative values, but focused on issues that resonated with the black community, Okafor told TheDCNF.

“He talked about criminal justice reform, he talked about economic empowerment zones, he talked about school choice,” Okafor said. “Those are thing that African-Americans have been wanting as a percentage to do something about but they only go to progressive policies because we haven’t done much to bring the message home that our conservative values actually do empower them in those problems.”

The GOP is often quick to dismiss diversity efforts and it shows in numbers — seven percent of the black community identifies as Republican and recent GOP presidential candidates have received between eight to nine percent of the black vote in recent elections. This leads to the question: Should the GOP focus on diversity?

Connors gave an empathetic yes, but also pointed out the GOP often doesn’t get enough credit for their efforts with minority outreach. Owens doesn’t care about the color of someone’s skin, but said she’s more concerned with the results they achieve for the black community.

“But I definitely think that we can do more and that’s kind of what the Black Republican Congressional Staff Association is doing on the public sector side,” Connors told TheDCNF. “They do a lot with trying to bring in diversity and trying to create space for people to be involved with the party, whether that is employment or deploying people out for campaigns or getting people involved in policy discussions.”

The Republican National Committee did not return The Daily Caller News Foundation’s request for comment in time for publication.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities for this original content, emaillicensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

The post Here’s How Young Black Conservative Women Are Changing The Face Of The GOP appeared first on The Daily Signal.

Here’s How Young Black Conservative Women Are Changing The Face Of The GOP

It’s pretty easy to name a couple of black women working in progressive circles and organizations, but it’s a lot harder to name the ones working within the conservative movement.

There’s a substantial national conversation about progressive black women like Tamika D. Mallory, an organizer of the Women’s March or Alicia Garza, a queer black woman who founded Black Lives Matter, who brought police brutality to the forefront of America or Tarana Burke who first created the #MeToo campaign that launched a conversation about the sexual harassment women face daily.

What’s less discussed are the young conservative, black women who are working every day to change and influence the Republican Party.

These women want to bring home a message of empowerment, not only to black women across the country, but also to the black community at large. Women such as Antonia Okafor, the founder of gun rights advocacy organization EmPOWERed, Ayshia Connors, a senior policy adviser to a Pennsylvania congressman and president of the Black Republican Congressional Staff Association, and Candace Owens, the director of Urban Engagement for Turning Point USA, all work tirelessly in advocating for their community and to make black conservative voices heard.

“Essentially, I believe in this day and age, for whatever reason, there is a largely ignored, growing group of voices which is essentially black conservatives. We’ve been largely dismissed and de-legitimized in the media as something that is not allowed to exist,” Owens, who labels herself an independent thinker, told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Owens is currently working on creating the first black leadership summit for Turning Point USA with the intent to bring young black conservatives from across the country to hear from other black leaders on how to become trailblazers and entrepreneurs within their community. Owens especially wants these young black conservatives to hear from fellow black leaders who don’t carry with them the same message the mainstream media does.

Okafor and Connors are also trying to make big strides within the conservative movement.

“I’m spreading the message of female empowerment through gun ownership, one that transcends all races,” Okafor said of her focus on her EmPOWERed college tour.

Connors, as the president of the Black Republican Congressional Staff Association, has not only doubled the number of members since she entered, but is also intent on using the organization to help young black Republicans and conservatives find jobs on Capitol Hill. Before joining as Pennsylvania GOP Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick’s senior policy adviser, Connors also worked with the Republican National Committee during the 2016 election.

Okafor is currently on her EmPOWERed tour, visiting college campuses to talk about female empowerment through gun ownership, a message not only for black women, but women of all races. Her tour includes stops at historically black colleges such as Howard University and Spelman College, where she hopes the face-to-face interaction with students will open their eyes.

“I think that what I hope to gain is that they see I am a person, a human being and I’m like them,” Okafor told TheDCNF. “I’m doing it because I want to empower the black community. I came out of being a closeted conservative and I’m vocal because when other people can see that there is someone else who looks like them and believes like them,unlike what society tells them to be like, it gives them courage.”

What many people don’t know is American history is a rich history with black women being unashamed of having conservative values.

There was Mildred Fay Jefferson, a pro-life activist, who was the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School, as well as Constance Berry Newman, a former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs under the former President George W. Bush’s administration. Also, Ida B. Wells, a founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, fought against the lynching of black people in America.

There’s still a lot more work that needs to be done, according to the women TheDCNF spoke to. They noted the GOP should work on messaging and how the party conveys their values to the black community should they wish to be successful with minorities in the future.

“A lot of the times when they have good ideas, they have trouble communicating them in a way that seems attainable,” Owens, also a vlogger, told TheDCNF, adding that the GOP should develop a sense of humor. “I think they just need a lot more personality.”

Connors also agreed that the Republican Party needs to work on messaging, but also how they explain those ideas to the black community. Most black Americans are naturally conservative and receptive to a message that centers around education leading to upward mobility. Criminal justice reform, often advocated by GOP Sens. Tim Scott of South Carolina and Rand Paul of Kentucky, also needs to pushed to the forefront, Connors said to TheDCNF.

Connors suggested making access for young people who want to serve on Capitol Hill, but may not have the resources to do so is crucial.

“You see a lot [of] people who aren’t able to come and intern on Capitol Hill because of financial hardship. Normally, it’s unpaid internships and a lot of people aren’t able to come and get that experience on Capitol Hill, which is why I don’t think you see a lot of minorities,” Connors told TheDCNF.

Okafor emphasized face-to-face interactions with people, saying the only way there can be a huge shift is if people talk one-on one. She pointed to Paul’s actions when he visited Howard University in 2015. Too often Republicans only enter the black community during an election cycle. Paul entered a black space and spoke to them about his conservative values, but focused on issues that resonated with the black community, Okafor told TheDCNF.

“He talked about criminal justice reform, he talked about economic empowerment zones, he talked about school choice,” Okafor said. “Those are thing that African-Americans have been wanting as a percentage to do something about but they only go to progressive policies because we haven’t done much to bring the message home that our conservative values actually do empower them in those problems.”

The GOP is often quick to dismiss diversity efforts and it shows in numbers — seven percent of the black community identifies as Republican and recent GOP presidential candidates have received between eight to nine percent of the black vote in recent elections. This leads to the question: Should the GOP focus on diversity?

Connors gave an empathetic yes, but also pointed out the GOP often doesn’t get enough credit for their efforts with minority outreach. Owens doesn’t care about the color of someone’s skin, but said she’s more concerned with the results they achieve for the black community.

“But I definitely think that we can do more and that’s kind of what the Black Republican Congressional Staff Association is doing on the public sector side,” Connors told TheDCNF. “They do a lot with trying to bring in diversity and trying to create space for people to be involved with the party, whether that is employment or deploying people out for campaigns or getting people involved in policy discussions.”

The Republican National Committee did not return The Daily Caller News Foundation’s request for comment in time for publication.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities for this original content, emaillicensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

The post Here’s How Young Black Conservative Women Are Changing The Face Of The GOP appeared first on The Daily Signal.

Problematic Women: #TimeIsUp at the Golden Globes, Oprah, and Kelly Clarkson

#ProblematicWomen: Episode 27

Problematic Women is back LIVE to talk fallout from the Golden Globes including Oprah and #TimeIsUp. We also talk about Kelly Clarkson’s decision to spank her daughter.Is that problematic?

Posted by The Daily Signal on Thursday, January 11, 2018

In this week’s edition of “Problematic Women,” co-hosted with Bre Payton of The Federalist, we cover the 2018 Golden Globe Awards. We also address an abortion in Nebraska that, according to a lawsuit, went horrifically wrong, and Google’s new fact-check feature that’s almost exclusively targeting conservative websites.

Finally, we crown Kelly Clarkson our Problematic Woman of the Week, for her decision to spank her daughter. Is corporal punishment problematic, or is it a mother’s choice? Joined by special guest Katie Frates, managing editor of Olympic Media, we discuss. Watch in the video above, or listen in the podcast below.

The post Problematic Women: #TimeIsUp at the Golden Globes, Oprah, and Kelly Clarkson appeared first on The Daily Signal.

I’m a Mormon, and The New York Times Needlessly Defamed My Church’s Leader

Thomas S. Monson, president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, died last week at the age of 90.

Revered as a prophet by the approximately 16 million Mormons scattered across the globe, Monson devoted his life to serving God and his fellow men.

So it was with great sadness that I read The New York Times headline announcing his passing, which cast him in a completely unfair light.

The Times wrote: “Thomas Monson, the president of the Mormon Church who rebuffed demands to ordain women as priests and refused to alter church opposition to same-sex marriage, died Tuesday at 90.”

Compare this to the headline announcing Fidel Castro’s death: “Fidel Castro, the Cuban revolutionary who defied the U.S., died Friday. He was 90.”

Or Hugh Hefner’s headline: “Hugh Hefner has died at 91. He founded Playboy magazine in 1953 and became inseparable from his brand.”

The New York Times used an obituary of a man who served his entire life with love to push a political message. In doing so, the Times demonstrated why many Americans cannot and do not take the publication seriously.

Monson was first called as a bishop of the church in his early twenties and served in the church from that time forward. He traveled the globe, administering to the weary and spreading the good word of Christ to all who would listen.

He was even instrumental in the construction of a Mormon temple behind the Iron Curtain in Eastern Germany, taking the church to areas of the world where it had been restricted.

Monson was best known for his charitable acts. As a young leader in Salt Lake City, the congregation which he oversaw included more than 80 widows. Monson made it a personal endeavor to regularly visit each and every widow to make sure their needs were met.

Under Monson’s leadership, in 2015 alone, the church responded to 177 emergency situations in 56 countries. The church has spent over $1.2 billion on humanitarian efforts over the past couple of decades.

Above all, Monson was a man of love. I remember gathering around the TV or laptop to listen to his sermons and always leaving with a full heart and a determination to love and serve those around me.

He once said, “Your heavenly Father loves you. That love never changes. It is there for you whether or not you feel you deserve love. It is always there.”

His smile was enormous. He often said that love is expressed in many recognizable ways: a smile, a wave, a kind comment, a compliment.

Why would the Times mistreat such a moral man as Monson?

As I scoured his full original New York Times obituary, I read much about his views on marriage and women and very little about his years of loving service to the poor, his empowering and uplifting sermons, and his unwavering love for all humanity.

A few days ago, a petition started circulating asking the Times to rewrite the obituary. That petition now has over 190,000 signatures. The petition, along with other online blowback, prompted the Times to address the issue.

Both Mormons and non-Mormons were right to call out The New York Times for its biased representation of who Monson was. But rather than simply apologizing, the Times tried to justify its actions:

In 20/20 hindsight, we might have paid more attention to the high regard with which he was held within the church. I think by his very position in the church, all that was implied. But perhaps we should have stated it more plainly.

But this statement didn’t suffice. After its release, calls continued to pour in for a change to the obituary. The Times eventually relented—it listened, and rewrote the obituary.

It deserves credit for doing so. But it shouldn’t take hundreds of thousands of complaints for the Times to produce fair and balanced content.

When Monson was called as a prophet of the church, I was a missionary serving in California. I’ve been a member of the Mormon church since my baptism at age 8. I have always looked up to Monson. I’m grateful that I know who he was and what he stood for.

He once said: “We must develop the capacity to see men not as they are at present but as they may become.” I hope to become a man like Thomas S. Monson.

The post I’m a Mormon, and The New York Times Needlessly Defamed My Church’s Leader appeared first on The Daily Signal.

Google’s New Fact-Check Feature Almost Exclusively Targets Conservative Sites

Google, the most powerful search engine in the world, is now displaying fact checks for conservative publications in its results.

No prominent liberal site receives the same treatment.

And not only is Google’s fact-checking highly partisan — perhaps reflecting the sentiments of its leaders — it is also blatantly wrong, asserting sites made “claims” they demonstrably never made.

When searching for a media outlet that leans right, like The Daily Caller (TheDC), Google gives users details on the sidebar, including what topics the site typically writes about, as well as a sidebar titled “Reviewed Claims.”

Vox, and other left-wing outlets and blogs like Gizmodo, are not given the same fact-check treatment. When searching their names, a “Topics they write about” section appears, but there are no “Reviewed Claims.”

In fact, a review of mainstream outlets, as well as other outlets associated with liberal and conservative audiences, shows that only the conservative sites feature the highly misleading, subjective analysis. Several conservative-leaning outlets like TheDC are “vetted,” while equally partisan sites like Vox, ThinkProgress, Slate, The Huffington Post, Daily Kos, Salon, Vice and Mother Jones are spared.

Occupy Democrats is apparently the only popular content provider from that end of the political spectrum with a fact-checking section.

The Robert Mueller fact check (pictured above) is a case in point for Google’s new feature.

Ostensibly trying to sum up the crux of the post, the third-party “fact-checking” organization says the “claim” in a DC article that special Counsel Robert Mueller is hiring people that “are all Hillary Clinton supporters” is misleading, if not false.

The problem is that TheDC’s article makes no such claim. Their cited language doesn’t even appear in the article. Worse yet, there was no language trying to make it seem that the investigation into the Trump administration and Russia is entirely comprised of Clinton donors. The story simply contained the news: Mueller hired a Hillary Clinton donor to aid the investigation into President Donald Trump.

Still, the Washington Post gave the claim, which came from Trump himself, its official “Three Pinocchios” rating. The method applies to several other checks. Claims concocted or adulterated by someone outside the TheDC are attributed to TheDC, in what appears to be a feature that only applies to conservative sites.

Examples of such misattribution and misrepresentation are aplenty.

For instance, using Snopes.com, an organization with highly dubious fact-checking capabilities, Google’s platform shows an article by TheDC to have a so-called “mixture” of truth.

The “claim” made, according to Snopes.com, and in-turn Google, is “a transgender women raped a young girl in a women’s bathroom because bills were passed…”

A quick read of the news piece shows that there was no mention of a bill or any form of legislation. The story was merely a straightforward reporting of a disturbing incident originally reported on by a local outlet. (RELATED: Why is Google CEO Eric Schmidt Technically Serving In The Department Of Defense?)

And like Snopes, another one of Google’s fact-checking partners, Climate Feedback, is not usually regarded as objective.

Snopes and Google also decided to “fact-check” an obviously tongue-in-cheek article in which a writer for TheDC pokes fun at a professor saying the solar eclipse in 2017 was naturally racist.

Even Vox pointed out the absurdity of the educator’s literary tirade on Mother Nature’s purported racial prejudice, and the damage it might have done to real arguments of apparent racism. While Snopes got some flak for its choice, no one seems to have noticed the absurdity of the world’s go-to search engine providing fact-checks to purposefully irreverent content, rather than hard news stories.

Overall, such inclusion embodies Google’s fact-checking services, which, as many presciently feared, are biased, if not also downright libelous. (RELATED: Silicon Valley Seems To Love Burying Conservative News)

Google acknowledged it received an inquiry from TheDCNF, but did not fully respond in time of publication.

The post Google’s New Fact-Check Feature Almost Exclusively Targets Conservative Sites appeared first on The Daily Signal.

My Quest to Help Americans Rediscover the Bible

I won’t make any assumptions about how many readers noticed I took a three-month break from column writing.

Nevertheless, I want to explain why.

I needed the time to finish the first volume of the biggest project of my life as a writer, a commentary on the first five books of the Bible, or what are called the Torah in Hebrew.

The commentary is addressed to people of every faith and, especially, to people of no faith.

I have believed all my life that the primary crisis in America and the West is the abandonment of Judeo-Christian values, or, one might say, the dismissal of the Bible.

Virtually everyone on the left thinks America would be better off as a secular nation. And virtually all conservative intellectuals don’t think it matters. How many intellectuals study the Bible and teach it to their children?

And yet, from the time long before the United States became a country until well into the 1950s, the Bible was not only the most widely read book in America—it was the primary vehicle by which each generation passed on morality and wisdom to the next generation.

Since that time, we have gone from a Bible-based society to a Bible-ignorant one—from the Bible being the Greatest Book to the Bible being an irrelevant book.

Ask your college-age child, niece, nephew, or grandchild to identify Cain and Abel, the Tower of Babel, or the ten plagues. Get ready for some blank stares.

I recently asked some college graduates (none of whom were Jewish) to name the four Gospels. None could.

But what we have today is worse than ignorance of the Bible. It is contempt for it. Just about anyone who quotes the Bible, let alone says it is the source of his or her values, is essentially regarded as a simpleton who is anti-science, anti-intellectual, and sexist.

Our society, one of whose mottos is “In God We Trust,” is becoming as godless as Western Europe—and, consequently, as morally confused and unwise as Europe.

Just as most professors regard most Bible believers as foolish, I have more or less the same view of most college professors in the liberal arts.

When I hear that someone has a Ph.D. in sociology, anthropology, political science, or English, let alone women’s studies or gender studies, I assume that he or she is morally confused and bereft of wisdom. Some are not, of course. But they constitute a small minority.

Whenever teenagers call my radio show or I meet one in person, I can usually identify—almost immediately—the ones who are receiving a religion-based education. They are far more likely to act mature and have more wisdom than their Bible-free peers.

One of our two greatest presidents, Abraham Lincoln, rarely attended church, but he read the Bible daily. As he said while president, “In regard to this great book, I have but to say, I believe the Bible is the best gift God has given to man.”

Were he able to observe America today, Lincoln would be shocked by many things. But none would shock him as much as the widespread ignorance of and contempt for the Bible.

I have taught the Torah, from the Hebrew original, for 40 years. Of the many things I have been blessed to be able to do—from hosting a national radio show to conducting orchestras—teaching Torah is my favorite.

When asked how it has affected my life, I often note that in my early 20s, when I was working through issues I had with my parents, there was nevertheless not a week during which I did not call them.

And there was one reason for this: I believe that God commanded us to “Honor your father and your mother.”

In my commentary, I point out that while the Torah commands us to love our neighbor, love God, and love strangers, it never commands us to love our parents. It was sophisticated enough to recognize that love of parents may be impossible but showing honor to a parent is a behavioral choice.

In America, there is an epidemic of children who no longer talk to one or both of their parents. In a few cases, this is warranted. But in most cases, adult children are inflicting terrible, unfair pain upon their parents.

This is one of a myriad of examples where believing in a God-based text is transformative.

Secular callers tell me that they hardly need the Ten Commandments to desist from murdering anyone. That may well be true. But apparently, a lot of people could use the Ten Commandments to avoid inflicting terrible pain on (admittedly, flawed) parents.

The title of my work is “The Rational Bible” because my vehicle to God and the Bible is reason. If you have ever wondered why all of America’s founders revered the Bible, let alone why anyone today might do so, this book should provide an explanation.

My ultimate aim is to help make the Bible America’s book once again.

The post My Quest to Help Americans Rediscover the Bible appeared first on The Daily Signal.

Problematic Women: Planned Parenthood, Iran Protests, and Celebrity Feminists

The voices of American feminists are largely absent on protests in Iran, Joy Behar  of “The View” says Trump needs to be “medicated and hospitalized,” Iceland takes its equal pay law to a new level, and Planned Parenthood released its 2017 annual report. All this and more in this week’s edition of Problematic Women, co-hosted with Katrina Trinko of The Daily Signal. Listen in the podcast below.

The post Problematic Women: Planned Parenthood, Iran Protests, and Celebrity Feminists appeared first on The Daily Signal.